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The Church of God
From The Creation to A.D. 1885

by Elder Cushing Biggs Hassell
Revised and Completed by Elder Sylvester Hassell

Chapter XXVI HISTORY OF THE CHURCHES
COMPOSING THE KEHUKEE ASSOCIATION IN 1885.

1. Beargrass, Martin County.—This church is situated in Martin County, about seven miles southwest of Williamston. She was for several years a branch of the church at Skewarkey. A meeting-house was built by the brethren and neighbors not far from a water course by the name of Bear Grass, from which the name was derived. Conferences were held and gospel ordinances administered for several years by Elder Joseph Biggs, pastor of the church at Skewarkey. In the year 1829 the members of the church at Skewarkey, convenient to this place, petitioned for dismission to form a constitution, which was granted, and Elders Joseph Biggs and Jeremiah Biggs and Jeremiah Leggett constituted a church at this place with thirty members. She then called on Elder Biggs, who consented to serve her as occasional pastor, and did so until 1832, when, from age and infirmity, he declined. After this time Elder John Ward served her as occasional pastor for some years.

In 1833 William Whitaker, being a member of this church, was licensed to exercise his gifts. In 1838 he was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by a presbytery composed of Elders Joseph Biggs and Humphrey Stallings. He was then very soon called to the pastoral charge of the church, and continued to fill that office to the period of his death which took place on November 23, 1874. After his decease the church called Elder Levi Rogerson, whose membership was at Smithwick’s Creek, to take the pastoral charge of her, and he continues in that capacity till this day, giving much satisfaction to the church. This church is now in a prosperous condition, having a goodly number of brethren to transact the business thereof. She has been favored, besides the services of her regular pastors, with the ministerial labors occasionally for the last forty years of Elders C. B. Hassell, Thomas Biggs, Henry Peal, William Gray, David House, William A. Ross, John L. Ross and Levi Rogerson. Her monthly meetings occur on the third Sunday and Saturday before in each month. Her number of members at present (1885) is forty-eight.

2. Bethlehem, Tyrrell County.—This church is situated about three miles southeast of Columbia, the capital seat of the county. It was at first called “Sound Side.” The members originally composing this church came mostly from the church at Scuppernong. The church was constituted in 1824 by Elders Micajah and James Ambrose.

She united with the Association in the same year, with twenty-seven members. Elder James Ambrose was called to the pastoral care, in which capacity he served the church until his death, which occurred in 1830. After his death she was served by Elder Micajah Ambrose until he died. She was then for a long period without any regular pastor, but was served by ministers from sister churches.

In 1842 William Reynolds became a member of this church, and in 1852 he was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by a presbytery composed of Elders Clayton Moore and Eli McGaskey. He was immediately called to the pastoral care of the church. In that capacity he served the church until October, 1878, when he departed this life while on his way home from the session of the Association held with the church at Kehukee, Halifax County, that year.

Her Deacons’ names in 1842 were Abraham I. Swain and William Kemp. Her next were William and James M. Barnes, then William R. Liverman, then Benjamin Reynolds and William Voliva-the last two were ordained in 1874. This church has had her peace much disturbed by “missionary” agents and Arminian Baptists; yet she stands firm in the faith once delivered to the saints. Her monthly meetings are now held on the third Sunday and Saturday before in each month. Her number of members is twenty-seven.

3. Bethlehem, Pasquotank County.—This church was constituted August 22d, 1849, by Elders George W. Carrowan and Samuel Tatum, from Coinjock Church, Currituck County. The meeting-house is situated half a mile from Elizabeth City, N. C. Elder Samuel Tatum was the first pastor (chosen in 1850), and Elder Charles Meads is the present pastor (chosen in 1876). William Forbes was the first Deacon, and Thomas Miller succeeded him. There have been six Clerks, as follows: D. B. Pendleton, John Tatum, William Forbes, William F. Sanders, William Greaves and Joseph B. Cooper, who was chosen in 1876, and is the present Clerk.

The present number of members is fourteen. The monthly meetings take place the first Sunday in each month and Saturday before.

The pastor, Elder Charles Meads, informs the present writer that this church is now in a very low state—the house of worship being so dilapidated that meetings can be held only in warm weather. May the Lord revive His blessed work of grace in the membership and in the neighborhood of this church.—[S. H.]

4. Beaverdam, Beaufort County.—This church was formerly called “Washington,” but changed her name in 1872. The house of worship is now situated about six miles below the town of Washington, in Beaufort County. The church was constituted in 1822, by Elders Joseph Biggs and Jeremiah Mastin. Elder Mastin took the pastoral care of the church, and served in that capacity until his death, which occurred in 1825. In 1837 Elder William Smaw took the care of the church. After his death Elders Miles Everett and Arnot Waters preached for the church. In March, 1866, Elder William B. Perry took the pastoral care of the church. In 1871 Elder Archibald Jones was chosen pastor. In 1873 Elder N. H. Harrison took the pastoral care of the church, and served her in that capacity several years.

Her Deacons have been Thomas McKeal, Levin Wallace and J. B. Litter.

Her Clerks have been Miles Everett, J. B. Archibald, George Elliot, W. G. Cooper, Jacob Swindel, James Satchwell, W. D. Singleton, J. V. Litter and Durden Aligood, who (the last named) remains in office to the present time. The regular meetings of the church are held on the second Sunday in each month and Saturday before. Membership at present, six.

5. Briery Swamp, Pitt County.—The church at Grindell Creek (now called Briery Swamp) was constituted about October 24,1827, of members dismissed from the church at Tranter’s Creek. The meeting-house was situated very near Pactolus, in said county. Names of persons at its constitution are as follows, viz.: William Cooper and William dark, both licentiates; Robert F. Lanier, Benjamin F. Eborn, Beazer Barrow, Lucilla Eborn and Penelope Lloyd, Louisa P. Clark and Eleanor Barrow (whites), and Tom Boston, Clarissa Easton and Hannah—(colored). Elders William J. Mewborn and Thomas D. Mason assisted in the organization. Trouble in the church arose on account of the new-made institutions of that day, under a religious garb, and the church eventually split and became scattered for ten years. In 1847 the meetings were revived, by the recommendation of Elder James Griffin and others, when the following names appeared on the church book, viz.: Elijah Langley, Willis Crandel, Benjamin F. Eborn, Joseph H. Langley, Nancy Spier, Elizabeth Langley, Elizabeth Little, Madliss Bishop, Susan Dudley and Jinney Moore (whites), and Prince Eborn, Bessey Carson and Jinney Staton (colored).

In 1852 Elder James Griffin, who had been serving the church until 1852, after its reorganization was then excused on account of inconvenience, as he lived so far away from the place of meeting; after which Elder William A. Ross, of Great Swamp Church, took the pastoral care, and continued in that capacity several years, and was succeeded by his brother, Elder John L. Ross, who is still her pastor.

The old meeting-house went to decay, and the land reverted to the original owners, so that the church held her meetings for several years in a school-house near the same place. Joseph H. Langley is her present Clerk.

A few years ago the place of meeting was transferred to a place six miles from Pactolns, a new meeting-house built, and the name of the church was changed from Grindell Creek to Briery Swamp. She has her meetings on the second Sunday and Saturday before in each month; and her present number of members is twenty-four.—[Last paragraph by S. Hassell.]

6. Castalia, Nash County.—This church was constituted April 17,1874, by Elders Bennett Pitt and William Woodard. Brethren Samuel Lancaster and William Odom served her as Deacons until brother Odom took a letter of dismission and joined the church at the Falls of Tar River. Brother Lancaster still serves. Elder Russell Tucker served as pastor from June, 1875, until November, 1876, when Elder B. C. Pitt took the pastoral charge and served her several years. Elder William E. Bellamy has been serving her for some time. This church united with the Association in 1874, Samuel Lancaster and Joseph Harper being her messengers to represent her in that body at that time. Her monthly meetings are on the fourth Sunday and Saturday before. Her present number in fellowship is eighteen.

7. Conoho, Martin County.—This church was formerly a branch of the church at Flat Swamp. She was dismissed from that body and constituted an independent body in 1794. Shortly thereafter she called on Elder Amos Harrell (then a member of the church at Sandy Run, Bertie County) to take the pastoral care, which he accepted, and continued her pastor for several years. After Elder Harrell’s death, Elder Benjamin Joyner served her as pastor some time, and was succeeded by Elder Jonathan Cherry. After his death she was without a settled pastor for several years, Elder William Hyman serving her as occasional pastor for a number of years. In 1852 Elder Blount Cooper was chosen her pastor, and this office he filled very acceptably to the time of his death, which occurred in or about July, 1854. He had, however, been preaching for them since 1839. For some years then she was without a pastor. In 1860 two of her members, viz., William F. Bell and John W. Purvis, were ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by a presbytery composed of Elders C. B. Hassell and William A. Ross. And as the church would make no choice between them, they both acted in the capacity of pastor until Elder Bell took his membership to another church, and then the church called on Elder Purvis to take the pastoral care. He served them till his death, in 1880. Elder M. T. Lawrence, a grandson of Elder Joshua Lawrence, has been their pastor since. He was licensed in 1878, and ordained in 1880. This church has been greatly blessed by ingatherings, so that it is now a large body. Besides those named already, this church has received the ministerial labors of Elders William W. K. Philpot, C.B. Hassell, David House, William A. Ross, John Stamper, R. H. Harris and John H. Daniel. Her stated meetings are the third Sunday and Saturday before in each month. Her yearly meetings are in September.

For many years John Bryan was considered the leading member in this body as a disciplinarian, and was not thought to be surpassed in this respect by any one belonging to the churches of the Kehukee Association. He died in July, 1865. Elder Blount Cooper and wife were received members of this church in 1839. At the December meeting, 1851, Elder J. W. Purvis was received to membership, and in November, 1853, licensed to exercise his gifts.

Elder C.  B. Hassell was called on to serve the church as pastor in 1854; he declined to accept, but agreed to serve her until a pastor could be had. Elder Bell was received a member of this church from Lawrence’s in May, 1858. Brother Archibald Staton was for many years Clerk of the church. Brother Joseph C. Hoard is the present Clerk. The members have a well-built and spacious meeting-house in which to worship, seven miles west of Hamilton, measures for the building of which were first adopted in 1850. Benjamin Martin and S. R. Harrell were Deacons for many years. The present number of members is one hundred and ten.

8. Conetoe, Edgecombe County.—This church is situated about eight miles southeast of Tarborough, and was formerly a branch of the church at Flat Swamp. While the latter was under the pastoral care of Elder Joseph Biggs, he attended this branch quarterly. On the Saturday before the fourth Sunday in July, 1803, this branch was constituted an independent body by Elders Joseph Biggs, Jonathan Cherry and Joshua Barnes. At that time the church called Thomas Ross, one of her members, to take the pastoral care of her, which he did not then accept; but on Saturday before the fourth Sunday in September following he was ordained by Elders Joseph Biggs, Jonathan Cherry and Luke Ward, and took the pastoral care of the church, in which office he officiated until his removal to Tennessee. She was then without a regular pastor for some time. Elder Thomas Dupree served her from about 1820 to 1845. In course of time Elder John H. Daniel, one of her members, acted as pastor for many years. His mind becoming impaired long before his decease, Elder William A. Ross accepted the pastoral care in February, 1856, and Elder David House took the pastoral charge thereof in September, 1873, and continues to serve as pastor to the present time.

Elder Daniel was baptized in December, 1829, ordained Deacon in July, 1831, licensed to exercise his gifts in October, 1833, and ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances in July, 1837.

This church has been uncommonly blessed by the visits of brethren in the ministry during the last thirty or forty years, among whom might be named Luke Ward, William Hyman, William Philpot, William Clark, William Dicken, John R. Moore, John Land, Blount Cooper, Jesse Baker, C. B. Hassell, John W. Purvis, Aaron Davis, B. P. Pitt, Thomas O’Berry, Clayton Moore, William Warren, William F. Bell and R. H. Harris, besides those previously named. A query was submitted to the Conference of this church in March, 1834, and answered, which may be worth noticing, viz.: “Is it right or not right for a gospel minister to attend and preach funeral sermons over the dead? Answer: We believe it an institution of man, and therefore not right.”

This church, though of long standing and sound in the faith, has but a small membership at present (fifteen). She had for many years in her body a good disciplinarian and a warm and affectionate exhorter in the person of William Thigpen, who died June 2, 1885. He maintained a high position in society and in the church, and was considered one of the most efficient, active and industrious, of his age, of any within the bounds of the Kehukee Association. Here is an instance well worth recording, where a warm and edifying exhorter for many years never aspired to the public ministry of the word. He was baptized in September, 1828, chosen Deacon in February, 1829, and served as Clerk nearly all the period of his membership. John Price was also ordained Deacon in July, 1837.

9. Concord, Washington County.—This church was constituted by Elders Micajah Ambrose and Amariah Biggs in the year of our Lord 1810, with fifty-eight members dismissed from the church at Scuppernong. Elder Ambrose accepted the pastoral charge of the church first, and after him Elder James Ambrose, George W. Carrowan, David I. Mot, William Gray, William Reynolds and Steven Biggs, three of whom held their membership with the church. Elder Biggs is pastor at present. Her Deacons have been Daniel Clifton, John Biggs, William Furlaugh, Jesse Sawyer, Darius Phelps, Steveu Biggs, Henry Bateman, Jordan Phelps, W. P. Jethro, James J. Ambrose and Isaac Furlaugh. Her Clerks have been Jacob Hassell, Maxey Tatum, Jesse Sawyer, Samuel Lewis, Jordan Phelps, James W. Clifton and Woodson S. Ambrose. This church is situated in the lower part of Washington County, and is some distance from any other church. The members, however, are sound in the faith, enjoy their meetings, and those who visit them enjoy them also. Their monthly meetings occur on the fourth Sunday and Saturday before. Her number of members is forty-seven.

10. Coinjock, Currituck County.—This church was first constituted in 1782, and revised in 1822. The number of males at her constitution was eleven; the number of females does not appear. Elder Henry Abbot was first pastor. Elder Malachi Corble was chosen pastor in 1824, Elder Samuel Tatum in August, 1825, Elder Hodges Gallop in 1851, Elder John D. Wicker in February, 1869, Elder Charles Mead in 1874, Elder Caleb T. Crank in October, 1876.

Deacons in 1808 were John Tatum and Joseph Baxter; in 1825, Foster Jarvis was appointed; in 1851, Abel Palmer; in 1852, Franklin Jarvis and Peter L. Tatum; in 1868, William Tatum; in 1877, John T. Hampton.

Clerks. In 1821 William Daxey was Clerk; in 1837 John Jarvis was chosen; in 1868, Dempsey Walker; and in 1874, William A. Parker, who is Clerk at the present time.

The church declared non-fellowship with the “Missionaries” in 1841. Number of members at present, twenty-three. The monthly meetings occur on the second Sunday and Saturday before. The house of worship is situated near Currituck Court House.

11. Cross Roads, Edgecombe County.—This church is situated about eight miles east of Tarborough, where two public roads cross each other. It was constituted on the Saturday before the second Sunday in July, 1803, by Elders Joseph Biggs and Jonathan Cherry, with members from the churches at Flat Swamp and Conoho. On the same day Elder Cherry was called to the pastoral care of the church, which he accepted, and continued in the discharge of that trust until his death, which took place in the year 1818. After Elder Cherry’s death Elder William Hyman was called to officiate as pastor, who accepted the call, and continued to fill that office until the day of his death, which occurred October 31, 1861. After his decease the church was served for a number of years by Elder John H. Daniel, and then by Elder David House, the former belonging to Great Swamp and the latter to Conetoe. Elder John W. Purvis and others preached for the church occasionally. In November, 1870, R. H. Harris, a Deacon of this church, was licensed to exercise his gifts; in April, 1875, he was set apart for ordination, and on the second Sunday in May, 1875, was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by a presbytery composed of Elders John Stamper and David House. He was then chosen pastor, and served the church in that capacity till his death in May, 1884. Elder William Hyman, who served this church for thirty-six years, was a most remarkable man for integrity, candor and popularity among all classes of people, and his decease ended the line of the worthies who had fought the great battle with the “Missionaries,” and gained the victory by creating peace in the churches and drawing the line distinctly between Old and New School Baptists.

Her Deacons have been Wallace Andrews, James Long and James W Andrews. Her Clerks have been Joseph H. Pippen, James S. Long and R. H. Harris. Her monthly meetings are on the second Sunday in each month and Saturday before. Her membership is seventeen.

12. Daniel’s, Halifax County.—This church, called for a while Fishing Creek, was constituted in 1755. Some of the pastors have been Elders Charles Daniel, Thomas Daniel, Silas Mercer, Joshua White, Halloway Morris, Philemon Bennett, John H. Daniel and Robert D. Hart. The number of members in 1803 was one hundred and twenty. The present number of members is eleven. The church has had no meeting-house for several years. The meetings are held, near Enfield, the second Sunday in each month and Saturday before. Elder William E. Bellamy serves the church.—[S. H.]

13. Deep Creek, Halifax County.—This church was constituted probably early in the present century by members from neighboring churches, and was formerly called Coneconary. The early records of the church before 1849 are lost. Elder Lemuel Bennett was chosen pastor in 1849; John Stamper in 1856; William F. Bell in 1872; and Jordan W. Johnson, the present pastor, in July, 1877. Lawrence Whitehead was ordained as Elder in 1863; and William E. Bellamy in May, 1881. Marcellus Pope was made Deacon in 1858; and W. B. White in 1879. Elijah Pope was chosen Clerk in 1852; Marcellus Pope in 1859; W. B. White in 1875; and W. P. Robertson, the present Clerk, in July, 1876. The number of members is thirty-eight. The meeting-house is about seven miles from Scotland Neck. The monthly meetings occur on the first Sunday and Saturday before.—[S. H.]

14. Elim, Currituck County.—This church was formed probably early in this century by members from Coinjock Church. The meeting-house is three-quarters of a mile from the post-office called Powell’s Point. The pastors have been Foster Jarvis, Samuel Tatum, Caleb T. Sawyer, Hodges Gallop, John D. Wicker and Avery J. Austin, the present pastor. The Deacons have been B. Owens, James Melson, Hodges Gallop, Stinson Sawyer, Caleb T. Crank, Graham Gallop, Jordan Snow, Edward Etheridge, Willoughby Sawyer, Benjamin Evans, William Owens, William Snow, Caleb Sawyer, John M. Jarvis, Ivy Dowdy, William M. Shaddick and Caleb C. Aydlett. The present number of members is thirty-six. The monthly meetings occur on the second Sunday and Saturday before. This church united with the Kehukee Association in 1831, having previously been a member of the Chowan Association.—[S. H.]

15. Falls of Tar River, Nash County.—The house of worship belonging to this church is situated on the North side of Tar River, a short distance from the Falls. This church is an ancient body of Christians, and was one of those that first formed the Kehukee Association.

From the best information that can be obtained, she was constituted on Swift Creek, by Elders C. Daniel and John Moore, in the year 1757. Whether constituted on the free-will or regular Baptist order, we are not able to say. Elder John Moore was her pastor for many years, while she was on the regular plan. In the year 1780 he took a dismission, and removed out of the neighborhood. After this, Emanuel Skinner, a worthy member, being raised up and ordained in the church, officiated as pastor, but was never called by the church to that office. In September, 1797, he took a dismission and removed to Cumberland, in Tennessee. In August, 1795, Elder Nathan Gilbert, an ordained minister, joined this church on a letter of dismission from the church at Scuppernong, and on Elder Skinner’s departure he supplied his place. In the year 1798 the church unanimously requested Elder Gilbert to take the pastoral care, but he did not accept of it until the year 1802. He continued the pastoral care until his death, which took place on the first of August, 1808. In 1802 eighty members were added to the church by baptism, and in 1808 seventy-four more were added. Eighty members were dismissed the same year to form a church on Town Creek.

After the death of Elder Gilbert the church called on Elder Joshua Lawrence to serve her, and he became successor to Elder Gilbert. Elder Lawrence was a young minister, eminent for his gifts and zeal, and had been ordained by Elders Burkitt and Read, at Fishing Creek, now Lawrence’s meeting-house. In the course of a year or two a large number of persons were added to the church by baptism, under his ministry. He baptized as many as twenty-two on one occasion, mostly young men and women; and in two years there were upwards of one hundred added to the church. Since the constitution to the year 1833 (the close of Elder Biggs’s history) there had been six hundred and thirty-five members of it. Eight ministers within that period had been raised up in it, viz.: Emanuel Skinner, Jordan Sherrod, Lewis Wells, John Atkinson, Elisha Battle, Jesse Andrews, Dr. John Gilbert, son of Elder Nathan Gilbert, and Josiah Crudup-the last four of whom were baptized by Elder Lawrence. The Battle family, in former years particularly, were very much identified with this church, and many of them have been leading and useful members in the church, as well as ornaments to society. James S. Battle, long a worthy member of this church, not only contributed liberally, while living, to meet the church expenses, but bequeathed in his will that the interest on $1,250 should be annually given to the pastor thereof, without limit as to time. And this amount has been faithfully to the present time handed to the pastor of said church by Mr. William S. Battle, son and executor of brother James S. Battle.

On Saturday before the second Sunday in 1830 Elder Lawrence resigned the pastoral charge of the church, and she then had no regular pastor until March, 1846, at which time Elder Blount Cooper took charge as pastor. During the interval between 1830 and 1846 Elder Lawrence attended occasionally, as did Elders Jordan Sherrod, William Hyman, Mark Bennett and others. Elder Cooper served as pastor from 1846 to 1854, in which year he was released by death from his ministerial labors.

Elder Robert D. Hart accepted the pastoral care in 1856, and held the office till his death, which occurred on the 24th of September, 1873. For several years, however, before his death, by reason of infirmity, he did not serve the church regularly.

After the death of Elder Hart, Elder P. D. Gold was chosen pastor, and fills the office to the present time. Her Deacons since 1830 have been Joseph Battle, Robert Sorey, Bennett Barnes, A. B. Baines, William Armstrong, James Odom, William Odom, William Trevathan and William E. Green.

Her Clerks have been, since 1830, James S. Battle, Willie Ricks, A. E. Ricks, Robert Ricks, John W. Vick and I. W. Bass. The last named was chosen in June, 1875, and still holds the office. Large congregations usually have attended the meetings of this church. An incendiary set fire to their house of worship some years ago and it was utterly consumed. But the zeal and public spirit of the church and her friends soon erected another in its stead, of a much larger capacity. It is thought to be larger by far than any other house of worship belonging to the churches of the Kehukee Association. Her monthly meetings occur on the second Sunday and Saturday before. Her present number of members is one hundred and eighty-three.

16. Flat Swamp, Martin County.—This church is situated near a swamp, from which it derives its name, near the Pitt County line, and was formerly in Pitt County. About the year 1766 the Spirit of the Lord began to breathe upon some of the dry bones in the valley of Flat Swamp and the Conetoe settlement, and several persons were seriously impressed with a sense of their lost condition and a desire for salvation; and accordingly an invitation was given to Elder Jonathan Thomas (pastor of the church at Toisnot, now called Wilson, Edgecombe County) to visit and preach to them, which he accepted, and his labors among them were greatly blessed. Numbers received gladly the doctrine of salvation by grace. Several persons were received to baptism upon an experience of grace, and became a branch of the church at Toisnot (Wilson).

In the year 1771, Elder Thomas informed them that he thought they were ripe for constitution, prepared a plan, and set them on the business, which was nearly effected, when Providence put a stop to it by calling this man of God out of time, and removing him to his eternal rest. In the beginning, however, of the year 1776, this church was constituted, with the assistance of the father and brother of the deceased minister; and at the same time John Page, one of her members, was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances. Elder Page took the pastoral care of the church, and labored with great zeal and success.

Shortly afterwards a branch of this church was established at Skewarkey, in Martin County; another at Great Swamp, in Pitt County; another at Conoho, Martin County; and another at Little Conetoe, Edgecombe County. In the year 1787 the branch at Skewarkey petitioned for dismission to be constituted, and after some delay it was granted in 1794. The branch at Conoho petitioned for dismission for the same purpose, which was granted in 1795. Some time previous to this the church had experienced great difficulties; as the love of many began to wax cold, it gave an opportunity for the enemy of souls to sow seeds of discord among them. The church seemed to go down to ebb tide, while errors were spreading and extending in the doctrines of Arminianism and Universalism. There were no ingatherings for several years, and the Lord was pleased to call their pastor to his rest in 1795; and although there had been raised up in this church several preachers, yet at this time she was entirely destitute of ministerial gifts. In this destitute situation she raised her cries to the Lord to send forth laborers, and to raise up one to go in and out before her. In answer to these cries, it appears the Lord was pleased to send her Elder Joseph Biggs, who had been lately received a member at Skewarkey. The church gave him a call to take the pastoral care in February, 1796, but according to his request ordination was deferred until February, 1797. The church being in a cold state and abounding with disorders, there were no additions, many excommunications, very little decorum, and conferences thinly attended. Often did her young pastor sit in conference with only seven or eight members. The few that did attend endeavored to stir the rest up to a sense of their duty, but their labors proved almost unsuccessful; and often did their pastor have reason to cry, “My leanness, my leanness! and who hath believed our report?” and would seriously think of giving over the pursuit. But being preserved and supported by an invisible hand, he held on his way, through many trials and sore conflicts, looking unto the Lord, and hoping God’s time to favor Zion was not far distant. He prevailed on brethren of different churches to visit each other and pray with and for one another, and Zion’s God heard their cries and answered their petitions.

In the latter part of the year 1800 there were several added to the church, and the work gradually progressed until the spring and summer of 1801 and 1802, when the gates of Zion seemed truly to be crowded with converts. In order to hear all that were desirous to tell what they thought the Lord had done for their souls, and who wished to offer for membership, the church found it expedient to divide and sit in two different places in the meeting-house at the same time; and surely the cry of heaven-born souls was then heard in the assembly of the saints. The congregations had now much increased in size, and the convicted from all quarters were calling on the ministers to pray for them. This church in about three years had an addition of about one hundred and forty-two members.

Elder Biggs served her about ten years, then took a dismission from her, and received the pastoral care of the church at Skewarkey. Shortly afterwards Elder Luke Ward joined this church on a letter of dismission from Skewarkey, and became her pastor, and continued in that office some years.

Elder William W. K. Philpot succeeded Elder Ward, until he died in November, 1860. The church was then without a pastor, but was attended by Elders David House and William A. Ross until 1872; and then by brother, afterwards Elder, John L. Ross, until 1880, when Elder J. L. Ross was dismissed to join the church at Briery Swamp (formerly Grindell Creek). In 1880 Elder David House was called to the pastoral care of the church, and still serves her in that capacity.

Her Deacons, of late years, have been James Highsmith, Standly Overton, 0. C. Gray and H. D. Jenkins. Samuel Keel was Clerk for many years until 1855; then James Highsmith until 1860; and, since that time, J. H. Robertson. Her monthly meetings are on the first Sunday and Saturday before. Her number of members is forty-nine.—[Last two paragraphs by S. H.]

17. Flatty Creek, Pasquotank County.—This church was constituted in 1790 from Camden Church, in Camden County, N. C. It has borne different names at different times-Flatty Creek, Newbiggin, Salem, and then Flatty Creek again. A majority of Salem Church became infected with the modern spirit of innovation, and the minority withdrew from them in 1833 and formed a separate body, and resumed the first name of the church with great appropriateness. At the separation the minority consisted of about a dozen members, and Joshua Markham was the Moderator of the first Conference. Elder Stanton Meads was chosen pastor April 25, 1869; and Elder Charles Meads was chosen pastor January 25, 1879, and is still the pastor. Dempsey B. Pendleton and Benjamin Pendleton and Stanton Meads have been Deacons of the church; and Thomas Markham and John S, Meads are the present Deacons. The Clerks have been as follows: John Westfield, Francis Fletcher, William F. Banks, A. B. Palmer, Joseph Sanders, Charles Meads, Benjamin H. Brothers and Henry C. Boyd, the present Clerk.

The meeting-house is near Nixonton, in Pasquotank County, N. C.; and the monthly meetings are the fourth Sunday in each month and Saturday before. The number of members at present is twenty-five. This church was admitted into the Kehukee Association in 1835.—[S. H.]

18. Great Swamp, Pitt County.—About four miles north of Greenville is situated the house where this church worships. She was formerly a branch of the church at Flat Swamp, and was called the Tar River Church. Upon petition she was dismissed in 1795, and shortly afterwards constituted and took the name of Great Swamp, from a certain water course of that name not far off.

She called on Elder Noah Tyson, a member of the church at Red Banks, in said county, to take the pastoral care, which he did, and served them until his death. He was a man much under bodily affliction, yet the church was not neglected among the families of Israel. The Lord remembered her, and gave zeal to her pastor and others, so that the word was preached and the ordinances duly administered.

After the death of Elder Tyson the church called on Elder James Ewell to take the pastoral care, who served them several years. She was afterwards served by Elder Luke Ward, and then by Elder Atkinson.

In June, 1840, Elder John H. Daniel agreed to become her pastor. In 1849 Elder Lanier Griffin accepted the pastoral care. In November, 1853, two of her own members, William A. Ross and David House, were ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by a presbytery composed of Elders John H. Daniel and Lanier Griffin, and since that period the church has been served by these two ministering brethren faithfully, without preferring either as pastor to the exclusion of the other. Elder House was received to baptism in July, 1847, and Elder Ross in June, 1849. Elder House was licensed in 1847; Elder Ross in 1851.

William Shivers was chosen Clerk in November, 1851, and continued in that capacity till his death.

Her Deacons in 1852 were Benjamin Flemming and Hardy Whichard, and in August, 1872, John T. Whichard was ordained to that office.

In 1850 the church became a member of the Skewarkey Union. Among the number of ministers visiting this church we notice the names of C. Bland, John L. Ross, Joseph E. Adams, besides those already named as pastors. Her monthly meetings are on the fourth Sunday and Saturday before; and her present number of members is thirty-two.

19. Hickory Rock, Franklin County.—Brethren from Peach Tree, Falls of Tar River and Toisnot met at Hickory Rock, in said county, on November 5, 1874, and appointed Elder Gold Moderator, and A. B. Baines Clerk. Six members were received—five on profession of faith and one by baptism. Brethren D. L. Aycock and William B. Uzzell were chosen Deacons, and were ordained by Elders P. D. Gold and Russell Tucker. Elder Tucker was chosen pastor, and filled that office several years.

This church was received a member of the Kehukee Association at its session held with the church at the Falls of Tar River in 1874. Her meetings are on the second Sunday and Saturday before; and she has nineteen members.

20. Hopeland, Nash County.—This church was constituted April 4, 1879, at Whitaker’s, N. C., and was first called the Church at Whitaker’s, but the name was afterwards changed to Hopeland. The Conference which formed the church was composed of Elders P. D. Gold and Andrew J. Moore and brethren C. B. Killebrew, Calvin Woodard, J. H. Pippen, N. K. Pippen, Lawrence Billups, Robert Armstrong, Norfleet Cutchin and others, and met in Elder Andrew J. Moore’s Academy at Whitaker’s. Elder Gold was chosen Moderator, and brother J. H. Pippen Clerk. The following seven members, all from Williams’s, first composed the church: Brethren N. K. Pippen, Lawrence Billups and J. H. Pippen, and sisters S. E. Pippen, Carrie E. Pippen, Mary Cherry and Martha Billups. At the following meeting (in May, 1879) Elder Andrew J. Moore was chosen pastor, and brother J. H. Pippen Deacon. Brother Pippen had been Deacon at Williams’s since 1873. The monthly meetings are the first Sunday and Saturday before. The church, which now has eighteen members, continued to meet in the Academy until the year 1881, when it met for the first time in a new and commodious house of worship erected near the Academy. Hopeland Church joined the Kehukee Association in October, 1879.—[S. H.]

21. Jamesville, Martin County.—This church was originally called Picot, and the meeting-house stood on the road leading from Williamston to Jamesville, about seven miles from Williamston. The body was for some years a branch of the church at Skewarkey, and was attended by Elder Joseph Biggs. Church discipline was attended to and gospel ordinances administered, and when ripe for constitution she petitioned the church at Skewarkey for dismission to form a constitution, which was granted, and in the year 1827 she was constituted by Elders James Ross and Joseph Biggs, with upwards of fifty members, and joined the Association the same year.

Elder Biggs accepted the pastoral care (occasional) of the church, and served her until about the year 1831, when from age and infirmity he resigned, and Elder Micajah Perry, of the church at Smithwick’s Creek, served as occasional pastor for some five or six years. Upon his moving into Washington County, Elders John Ward and Humphrey Stallings agreed to serve alternately as occasional pastors, which service they continued to render till their removal to Tennessee. Before they left the State, at a yearly meeting of the church held on the third Sunday in August, 1840, and two days preceding, Clayton Moore, a young man raised up in the neighborhood of the church, and who for about five years had been exercising as a local preacher among the Methodists, applied for membership in the church, and being received, was baptized in Roanoke River, at the Old Field, one mile above Jamesville, Sunday morning, by Elder John Ward. Being urged forward by the members of the church, the young member soon began to speak in public as a licentiate in that church, where his mother had held membership from its constitution.

He, was urged to accept ordination, but put it off till late in the year 1847. He was at length made willing to yield under a severe spell of sickness, and upon recovery passed under the hands of a presbytery composed of Elders C. B. Hassell, Thomas Biggs and William Whitaker. He was then called to the pastoral care of the church, and continued to serve the church as such until his death, in December, 1881. He was the first regular pastor the church has had, and the only one who ministered to her as pastor that came from her own membership. He was a gifted, able, interesting and instructive minister of the gospel, and a profound thinker. He was the first and most earnest advocate of the preparation of the present History.

Brother William B. Perry, son of Elder Micajah Perry, was licensed by this church to exercise his gifts in 1852, and in about three years thereafter was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by Elders C. B. Hassell and Clayton Moore. He was zealous in the cause of his blessed Master, and was firmly established in the doctrine of salvation by grace from first to last. He departed this life in 1867. He died as he had lived, strong in the faith.

Her Deacons have been Joshua Robertson, Kenneth Lanier, Septimus B. Williams, James Ward, William B. Perry and William Jones; at present, Hoyt N. Waters, Martin Jackson and James Williams.

Her Clerks have been John G. Smithwick, William B. Perry, John R. Mizell and others; at present, John Reddick. Brother James Hinson was licensed to preach by this church, and did so for five or six years.

Brother Joshua Robertson was also licensed to exercise his ministerial gifts, and did so with great satisfaction to the brethren some few years, till he died, which occurred in 1848. He was not ordained, but sound in the faith, and held a high reputation, with the world even, as a man of veracity and honor. The chief theme in his discourses was Faith.

Elder Joshua T. Rowe was for several years the faithful and acceptable pastor of this church. Her meetings are on the first Sunday in each month and Saturday before; and her present number of members is thirty-three.—[Last paragraph by S. H.]

22. Kehukee, Halifax County.—This is considered the mother church of the Kehukee Association. The Association was organized and held with this body in 1765, and derived its name from this church. She was first gathered and constituted, in 1742, with members who had been received on the free-will plan; but on being visited by Elders Vanhorn and Miller, from the Philadelphia Association, she was established on the regular order, and joined in covenant in the year 1755. She was, after her regular organization, under the care for some years of that eminent servant of our Lord Jesus Christ, Thomas Pope. After the death of Elder Pope she was under the care of Elder Meglamre for some years. Elder Meglamre removed to Sussex, in Virginia, and resigned the pastoral care to Elder William Burgess, who was raised in Camden County. Elder Burgess continued to officiate as pastor until called home to rest from his labors.

The church had now grown very cold, and by reason of deaths, ex-communications and removals was greatly decreased in number. Elder Silas Mercer occasionally attended her meetings. After his removal to Georgia she was for a while attended by Elder Joshua White. After his removal to the West, Elder Lemuel Burkitt visited her. After his death she was attended by Elder Joshua Lawrence for a number of years.

From about 1830 to 1860 there appears to have been no regular pastor. On the tenth of May, 1860, Elder John W. Stamper was called, and took the pastoral charge of the church. He served her faithfully until his death, which occurred July 9, 1876. From 1830 to 1876 her monthly meetings were held on the second Sunday and Saturday before. When the church was so long without a pastor she was not neglected by the ministry; but was served occasionally and alternately by Elders Joshua Lawrence, William Hyman, William Dickens, Lemuel Bennett, Lawrence Whitehead, William F. Bell, John H. Daniel and C. B. Hassell.

On the second Saturday in December, 1876, the monthly meeting was changed from the second to the first Sunday, and Elder P. D. Gold was called to take the pastoral care. On the first Saturday in January, 1879 (Elder Gold having resigned), the time of meeting was changed to the third Sunday in each month, and Elder Andrew J. Moore was chosen pastor, and so continues to the present time. General Young was Clerk of the church from June meeting, 1823, to July meeting, 1833; John Shields from then till about October, 1858; Jethro Edmonds from then till about August, 1871; M. D. Alsbrooks from then till May, 1872; Turner Bass from then till his death; and B. I. Alsbrooks from April, 1874, to the present time.

Thomas Brewer was Deacon from July meeting, 1826, to April meeting, 1835; General Young from then to March meeting, 1843; Turner Brewer from then until September meeting, 1857; Jethro Edmonds from then until August 12, 1872; M. D. Alsbrooks from then until the present time, and J. H. Alsbrooks from second Sunday in May, 1874, to the present time.

Previous to 1871 the church was much reduced in the number of members, and could not for a long time conduct the business of conference without the assistance of other churches; but since that time she has been greatly blessed with additions. The Lord has been pleased to visit her with seasons of refreshing, and added to her numbers such as He would have to be saved, and such as we believe He will own and bless in a coming day. Her membership now amounts to one hundred.

23. Lawrence’s, Edgecombe County.—This church was formerly a branch of the church at Kehukee, and until the year 1805 they were both represented in the Association. But a committee having been appointed to inquire into its standing, Lawrence’s was found to have been a constituted church for many years; so that she joined the Association as a new member in 1805. She was then under the pastoral care of Elder Joshua Lawrence. She had ninety members when she joined the Association, but by dismissions, deaths, removals, etc., she became greatly reduced in members afterwards. This church is named after Elder Joshua Lawrence, who was a member of it, and it is to be regretted that the church book for about eighteen years (from 1831 to 1849) is lost. He served this church as pastor long and faithfully, but we cannot determine as to the exact time. In 1849 Elder Blount Cooper was pastor, and the church enjoyed some seasons of refreshing under his ministry. He served till December, 1853, after which he was called home. Afterwards Elder John Stamper was called, and served till May, 1872. In April, 1873, Elder William F. Bell was called, and he served till May, 1877. In October, 1877, Elder James S. Woodard, of Wilson, N. C., consented to serve the church as her pastor, and continued to do so in a very acceptable manner till May, 1882. After this, Elder R. H. Harris served her a short time as pastor till his death in 1884. Elder M. T. Lawrence has been visiting her occasionally since.—[S. H.]

One of her own members, brother William T. Staton, after having been licensed several years to exercise his gifts, was ordained to the ministry in 1885; and another member, brother William Hearn, has for some years been licensed to exercise his gifts.—[S. H.]

Deacons: Brethren Charles Mabry and John White were ordained Deacons in May, 1849. Brother Mabry served a great many years. Brother White was dismissed by letter in 1857. Brother Turner Bass was ordained in May, 1853; dismissed by letter in 1872. Brother William Faithful was ordained in October, 1869, and served the church till his death, in 1885. Brother William Hodges was ordained in August, 1872, and yet serves the church. Brother M. G. Weathersbee was ordained in February, 1879, and served till 1881.

Clerks: Brother Turner Bass was appointed Clerk in February, 1849, and served till April, 1869. Brother Nathan G. Pitt was appinted in 1869, and served till January, 1879. Brother J. M. Howell was appointed in January, 1879, and serves to the present time.

Brother Richard Harrison was long a member of this church, and, to show his care for it, before he died, willed to it five hundred dollars, the interest on which was to be paid to the pastor thereof yearly, without limit.

This church became a member of the Skewarkey Union, at Flat Swamp, in June, 1850. She is now in a very healthy condition, and numbers eighty members. Her monthly meetings are on the fourth Sunday and Saturday before.

24. Lebanon, Dare County.—This church was formed from Providence Church, May 10, 1879. Elder J. D. Wicker, of Kitty Hawk, Currituck County, was chosen pastor; Lamb Basnight and Wilson Turiford, Deacons; and Manlif Turiford, Clerk. The church contains twenty-one members, and has its meetings on the third Sunday in each month and Saturday before.—[S. H.]

25. Morattock, Washington County.—The house of worship for this church is situated about three miles southwest of Plymouth, near a creek of the same name. This church has a singular history. It was first gathered through the instrumentality of Elders Silas Mercer and John Page, and they were succeeded by Elder Martin Ross. A few persons were at first connected in church relationship, but some of them were unworthy members, and hastened her downfall, so that she in a little time became extinct. Others of her number, however, delighted in church fellowship, and became members of the church at Skewarkey (a great distance off), then under the pastoral care of Elder Martin Ross. They attended the meetings quarterly at Skewarkey until 1791, when they petitioned the church for dismission to be again constituted, which was granted. The body was then small, and passed through another night of coldness and spiritual darkness. She was attended by Elder Ross until his removal to Yoppim, and then by Elder Amariah Biggs. In the years 1801 and 1802 she experienced some refreshing showers, and called upon Elder Amariah Biggs to take the pastoral care, which he accepted, and took a letter of dismission from the church at Scuppernong and joined this church, and continued to officiate as pastor until his death, in 1827.

In 1830 Elder Micajah Ambrose took the care of the church. Silas Murray was licensed in September, 1836. Elder Ambrose was succeeded by Elder Barnes, who took the pastoral care in September, 1836, and he was succeeded by Elder Micajah Perry, who was chosen November 20, 1841. Elder Perry was succeeded by Elder Miles Everett, who was chosen pastor December 17, 1842, and Elder Everett was succeeded by Elder Arnot Waters on January 16, 1847. Elder William Gray was licensed to exercise his gifts January 15, 1848, was ordained January 19, 1850, by a presbytery composed of Elders Miles Everett and Arnot Waters, and took the pastoral care of the church in November, 1853. Elder R. W. Peacock was licensed in March, 1860, and ordained January 20, 1866, by the laying on of the hands of Elders William Gray and Jonathan Wallace. Elder N. H. Harrison was liberated to exercise his gifts in public in January, 1866, and ordained by Elders William Gray, William B. Perry and G. T. Tuggle, February, 1867. Elder A. Craddock was licensed in November, 1871, and ordained April 20, 1872, by a presbytery composed of Elders Gray and Harrison.

Elder Joseph E. Adams united with the church on June 17,1876, upon a letter of dismission from the church at Fellowship, Johnston County, N. C. Elder Gray died March 6, 1879, and since his death there has been no choice made of a pastor to succeed him. The church has now among her members four ordained ministers, viz., Harrison, Adams, Craddock and J. T. Rowe, and, in addition to these and other visiting Elders, she had for several years the services of that able and faithful minister of God, Elder Clayton Moore, of Jamesville, who for a long period visited almost regularly at her monthly meetings.

Deacons of the church have been, since 1830, about as follows, viz.: Charles Blount, William Gray, Thomas H. Turner, Daniel Leggett, E. W. Ayers, Edmond Harrison, James A. Harrison and Asa R. Allen.

Her Clerks have been Malichi Corprew, W. W. Mizell, Charles Blount, Daniel Leggett, D. T. Ayers, T. S. Latham and E. G. Peacock; the last named continues to fill the office to the present time.

The time of her monthly meetings occurs on the third Sunday and Saturday before. The number in fellowship is ninety-five.

26. North Creek, Beaufort County.—The house of worship belonging to this church is situated near North Creek, in said county. Near this church there was formerly a society of the free-will order, of which one Elder Winfield was pastor; but it pleased the Lord that the gospel should be preached here, and many persons embraced the truth and were constituted into a church. Elder James McCabe took the pastoral care, and continued in that office until his death in the year 1807. This church was formerly called Pungo, but the name was changed from that to North Creek. Elder Lemuel Ross had the pastoral care of the church from 1824 to 1837.

Elder Miles Eorest then served the church a few years, after which Elder Arnot Waters became pastor until 1855. Then Elder Albin B. Swindelle served as pastor until 1861. From that year to 1866 the church had no regular pastor, when Elder Bryan Whitford, of Craven County, was chosen, and has been pastor ever since; but of late years he visits the church only once or twice annually, while Elder D. W. Topping, who was ordained in June, 1870, by Elders N. H. Harrison and Bryan Whitford, has been serving the church monthly. In 1868 the membership increased to about seventy, but a season of coldness followed. The present number in fellowship is twenty. John Satchwell and William Ross were among the first Clerks. Ira H. Topping, father of Elder D. W. Topping, was Clerk from March, 1868, till his death in March, 1883. The present Clerk is William Baynor, and the Deacon is J. S. Sadler. The regular meetings occur on the third Sunday in each month and Saturday before.—[Last paragraph by S. H.]

27. Peach Tree, Franklin County.—This church was constituted on Saturday before the fifth Sunday in April, 1850, by Elders John H. Daniel, Blount Cooper and Robert D. Hart.

The house of worship is situated on the road leading from Louisburg to Nashville, about ten miles below Louisburg.

William Jackson and Dempsey Bowden were ordained Deacons of the church at the time of her organization, and their successors were brother Yelvington and brother Calvin J. Walker.

Elder Hart served the church as pastor from the period of her organization to November, 1859. She was then without a pastor until 1862, at which time Russell Tucker, one of her members, was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by a presbytery composed of Elders John H. Daniel and John W. Purvis, and was then called on and accepted the pastoral care of the church. He still served her faithfully, for more than twenty years (with a short exception), even under much bodily affliction, until his death, November 12, 1883.

This church is situated on the borders of the Association boundary, and is surrounded by great numbers of “missionaries;” but she remains firm and steadfast in the Apostles’ doctrine, unshaken in the least by the high winds of error that sweep all around her. Her membership deserve high commendation from their brethren everywhere for the noble stand taken by them and maintained in the cause of their blessed Master. Her meetings occur on the third Sunday in each month and Saturday before. She has thirty-nine members at present.

28. Providence, Currituck County.—Providence Church, North Banks, Currituck County, was constituted on August 26, 1854, by a presbytery composed of Samuel Tatum and C. T. Sawyer, with eight members, four of them females. Elder Hodges Gallop was called to the pastoral care of the church; brethren Enoch F. Beals and Jasper Toler were the first Deacons, and brother Hezekiah W. Beasley the first Clerk.

Elder Gallop served the church as pastor until his death, which occurred in February, 1877. In May, 1877, Elder John D. Wicker was chosen pastor, and continues in that office to the present time. He was ordained in January, 1866. In 1870 George Scarborough was ordained Deacon in place of Jasper Toler. Brother H. W. Beasley resigned the office of Clerk, and brother William Wicker was appointed in his place; and in January, 1872, brother Wicker resigned, and brother William C. Beals was appointed in his place. Brother Samuel J. Harris succeeded him, and died in April, 1878. He was succeeded by the present incumbent, brother William J. Morse. The present standing of the church is about as follows, viz.:

Elder J. D. Wicker, pastor; Elder H. W. Beasley; licentiates, A. J. Austin and John Rogers; Deacons, Enoch F. Beals, George W. Scarborough and Willis Morse; Clerk, William J. Morse. Aggregate, four ministers, three Deacons, one Clerk, forty-nine members in all. Her monthly meetings occur on the fourth Sunday and Saturday before. She has forty-nine members.

29. Pungo, Beaufort County.—This church was constituted in the year 1824, with members dismissed from North Creek Church, and became a member of the Association in 1825, with fifteen members. Her meeting-house is situated near the head of Pungo River. She was many years ago troubled a good deal by the preaching of the doctrines of the general atonement, etc., which produced some dissension among her members, and in order to restore harmony she had to expel several members.

Among her occasional and regular pastors were Elders Ross Carrowan, Miles Eorest, G. W. Carrowan and A. B. Swindelle. During the war the church had no pastor, and got into a low condition. In 1866 Elder N. H. Harrison was chosen pastor, and served the church until 1879, when Elder Daniel W. Topping was chosen pastor, and still continues to serve the church in that capacity.

The number of members is twenty-four. H. L. Davis is the present Clerk, and Daniel Paul the Deacon. Two of the members of this church, David Carter and Aquila Paul, have been licensed to exercise their gifts in public.

The regular meetings of this church take place the second Sunday in each month and Saturday before.—[Last three paragraphs by S. H.]

30. Rocky Swamp, Halifax County.—Some time during the year 1767 Jesse Read was brought to see himself a sinner justly condemned; but by the grace of God he was enabled to believe in Christ as the Savior of his soul. There were then no Baptists in the settlement. Brother Read began to read Whitefield’s sermons in public, feeling, as he did, a desire for the salvation of his fellow-mortals. But the Lord of the harvest soon sent forth some of His servants into this part of His vineyard. First Elder Charles Daniel; then Elder Jeremiah Walker; also Elder John Tanner. The Lord was pleased to bless the labors of His faithful ministers. Very soon several persons made public profession and were baptized, and were considered a branch of the church at Daniel’s meeting-house, on Fishing Creek. Soon afterwards the meeting-house was built where it now stands, on a piece of land which Elder Read gave for that purpose. On July 11, 1774, the church was constituted with the assistance of Elders Walker, Tanner and Joseph Anthony. There were only eight members at the constitution.

The same year the church sent messengers and letter to the Separate Baptist Association, which was held that year in Amelia County, Virginia, and was received a member of that body.

After this union with the Separate Baptist Association, brother Read began to exercise his gifts to the satisfaction of his brethren, and was finally set apart for ordination. He was ordained on May 5, 1775, by Elders Samuel Harris and Joseph Anthony. He was then called to the pastoral care of the church, and continued to serve her as pastor until old age and weakness of mind prevented his doing so. He died about the year 1820. He, with Elder Lemuel Burkitt, compiled the first history of the Kehukee Association, reaching down to 1803.

Rocky Swamp was one of the ten churches which joined the Kehukee Association after she became established on her present basis. She was constituted with eight members in 1774, and between that time and 1803 two hundred and sixty persons had been baptized into her communion. But by reason of dismissions, removals, deaths and other causes, she held in fellowship in 1803 only about one hundred members.

This church has been wonderfully blessed by the services of visiting brethren in the ministry. After the death of Elder Read she gave Elder Philemon Bennett a call to the pastoral care, which he accepted, and continued to serve her until about 1833, when from old age and other causes he failed.

About the year 1831 the church experienced some trouble by obtaining a letter of dismission to unite with others in the formation of a new Association. But when the new Association was formed (called the Tar River Association) it proved to be a “missionary” body; so that the church had to retrace her steps and again unite with the Kehukee. This reunion took place in 1837. After this event the church had very little preaching for about two years. In 1839 the Lord was pleased to send Elder Blount Cooper to preach for her, and he continued to do so until 1842. Brother L. B. Bennett became a member of this church in 1833; was liberated to exercise his gifts in January, 1841, and in 1843 (February 19) was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by a presbytery composed of Elders John H. Daniel and Blount Cooper. He took the pastoral care of the church after his ordination, and continued to serve her in that capacity till May, 1880. Elder J. W. Johnston was chosen pastor in July, 1880, and still serves her in that capacity. This church has met with much opposition and persecution from the “missionaries,” but remains firm in the faith to the present time. Her stated meetings are on the fourth Sunday and Saturday before in each month. She has forty-two members.

31. Sandy Grove, Nash County.—This church was constituted in 1813, with the name of Antioch, with about twenty-three members, on what was known as Turkey Creek, in said county. These members came from the church at Sappony. They chose for their pastor Elder Jordan Sherwood, and for their Deacons brethren John Rice and Osborne Strickland, for their Clerk William Jordan. These brethren built them a house and held their meetings monthly, and the Lord blessed them and increased their numbers considerably.

About the year 1835 a gentleman by the name of Lemon gave them a site in the neighborhood of what is now called Stanhope, on which they built a house, and called it “Lemon’s Meeting-house.” They continued to worship in this house until it decayed, when they put up a new house on the same lot of land, and gave it the name of Sandy Grove. Elder Sherwood remained pastor until his death. For a long time after the death of Elder Sherwood the church had no regular pastor. Shortly after the death of the two old Deacons (brethren Rice and Strickland) James M. Baines and Isaac Strickland were appointed Deacons, and A. B. Baines Clerk, who continued in office until a division took place in the church in regard to missions, when about half the members left the old landmarks; the rest remain until this day contending for the faith once delivered to the saints.

Elder Russell Tucker served as pastor several years. Elder Bernard Greenwood, a native of Germany, and at present a resident of Wilson, N. C., has been, since 1881, a member and the pastor of Sandy Grove Church.—[S. H.]

Her meetings are on the fourth Sunday and Saturday before in each month. She has forty members.

32. Sappony, Nash County.—The house of worship belonging to this church is situated about twelve miles west of Rocky Mount and seven miles south of Nashville. The church was constituted on August 7, 1804, by Elders Nathan Gilbert, Henry Hunt and Francis Winstead. It was composed of twenty-six members, who received letters of dismission from the church at the Falls of Tar River. At the first Conference, which was in August, Elder Jordan Sherwood was called, and accepted the pastoral care of the church. Elder Vick was chosen Clerk; John Poland and Edward Ballard Deacons.

The Lord granted refreshing seasons to this little band of brethren until their number soon increased to sixty. Elder Sherwood continued the pastoral care until his death, which took place on December 10, 1842. Shortly after his death Elder Sherwood Williams was chosen pastor, and continued for several years, and then left them and moved to the State of Georgia, since which time the church has had no regular pastor, except for a very short space of time.

In 1812 John Poland resigned his Deaconship, and brother Matthew Joyner was appointed in his place, and continued Deacon until his death. After the death of Deacon Ballard, brother Isaac Vick was appointed in his stead; and at the death of brother Vick, brother A. B. Baines was appointed, and continued in office until he joined the church at the Falls of Tar River. Shortly after brother Baines joined the Falls Church, brother Joel Barnes was appointed Deacon, and holds said office at the present time.

The church has for several years been in a cold and drooping state; yet we think there are some precious jewels there, and some whoso ears have been opened to hear the joyful sound of salvation by grace when proclaimed by the under-shepherds. For a few years past brethren Cooper Pitt, Wiggins, B. Greenwood and other brethren have been preaching for them, but they have no regular pastor. Her stated meetings are on the third Sunday and Saturday before in each month. She has fourteen members.

33. Skewarkey, Martin County.—This church was originally a branch of the church at Flat Swamp, then under the care of Elder John Page, who visited this branch for several years, and under whose ministry the cause of truth flourished. Some time afterwards Martin Ross, one of the members of this church, was licensed to speak in public. The members subsequently petitioned the church for dismission to form a constitution. After some delay it was granted, and she was constituted by Elders Lemuel Burkitt and John Page, and her young preacher ordained in 1787. For several years she had some additions, but, like other churches, a time of coldness came on, and she experienced a considerable portion, although her pastor served her regularly and preached a great deal elsewhere.

About 1791 some members in the neighborhood of Morattock petitioned for letters of dismission to form a church at that place. In 1796 Elder Ross took a letter of dismission to join a church at Yoppim, and at the same time Joseph Biggs, a young member, took a letter of dismission to join the church at Flat Swamp. It was with reluctance they were granted, as that would strip her of ministerial gifts. She therefore groaned under her afflictions until the kind hand of Providence favored her in raising up Elder Luke Ward, a member of said church, to the work of the ministry. In 1799 he was ordained by Elders Joseph and Amariah Biggs. The Lord has been pleased to raise up quite a number in this church to the work of the ministry, viz.: Martin Ross, Aaron Spivey, Joseph Biggs, Luke Ward, Abram Tice, Harrell Cherry, John Bennett, James Daniel, John Tice, John Ward, C. B. Hassell, Thomas Biggs and Sylvester Hassell.

In the year 1803 thirty-four members were dismissed from this church to form one at Smithwick’s Creek, and about the same time about twenty more were dismissed to form a church at Tranter’s Creek. In the year 1827 she dismissed about fifty members to form a church at Picot meeting-house, and also upwards of twenty members to form a constitution at Beargrass. About the year 1806 Elder Luke Ward took a letter of dismission and joined the church at Flat Swamp, and about the same time Elder Joseph Biggs returned from Flat Swamp to this church and took the pastoral care thereof, and continued in that capacity until his death, which occurred May 31, 1844. After Elder Biggs took the pastoral charge the church was in a very cold condition, and had become much reduced in numbers. By death she had lost her Deacons and Clerk, and Elder Biggs had to officiate as Minister, Deacon and Clerk, in the year 1816 this church experienced some additions, and the same continued more or less for many years.

After the death of Elder Biggs, in 1844, Elder C. B. Hassell was chosen pastor in November following, and continued to act in that capacity till his death, April 11, 1880. He was baptized in 1828, licensed in 1842 (January 8), and ordained in 1843 (December 5). Elder C. B. Hassell was ordained by Elders William Hyman, William Whitaker and James Osbourn. He was baptized by Elder Joseph Biggs on March 13,1828, at a place called “Back Swamp Bridge,” about two miles west of Skewarkey meeting-house. Some years after his ordination, Thomas Biggs, a member of this church, and a nephew of Elder Joseph Biggs, was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances; but, being much afflicted with rheumatism, he never took the pastoral care of any church or baptized any person. He was sound in the faith, and for many years sat in a chair in the pulpit when delivering his discourses. He visited other churches also, and was very useful as a minister and as a disciplinarian.

In 1864 Sylvester Hassell, son of Elder C. B. Hassell, was baptized by his father in Roanoke River. In 1871 he was licensed to exercise his gifts, and in August, 1874, was ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances by Elders C. B. Hassell, William Whitaker and David House. Since 1881 he has been pastor of the church at Skewarkey.

A long line of Deacons might be named as having belonged to this church; the two officiating at the present time are Melton Bennett and William Slade. Brother Joseph D. Biggs, son of Elder Joseph Biggs, united with this church in 1826, and has served the church as Clerk ever since September, 1828. He has also served the Association as Clerk ever since the death of his father, who had served in that capacity for many years up to the period of his death. Asa Biggs, son of Elder Joseph Biggs, was also a member of this church, and one of the most useful and exemplary that she ever had. He was a public man to a great extent, filling many offices in the course of his life. He was an eminent lawyer, colonel of a militia regiment, member of both branches of the Federal Legislature, Federal and Confederate Judge, besides filling other honorable stations. He was born in 1811, baptized by Elder C. B. Hassell in 1853, and died in 1878.

Skewarkey meeting-house stands about one mile from Williamston, on the Washington road. Her meetings from the beginning, we believe, have been held on the second Sunday and Saturday before in each month.

Her Clerks, besides the present one, have been Jacob Morris, John Ferrill, H. Biggs, Nathan Ross and Daniel Biggs. Her Deacons, besides the present incumbents, have been William Biggs, Reuben Ross, James Hardison, Starling Rogers, Alfred Moore, Stanly Duggan and William Melson.

Elder Joseph Biggs, member of this church, by authority of the Kehukee Association, brought the history of said Association from 1803 down to 1833; and Elder Sylvester Hassell was similarly authorized to revise and complete said history to the present time.—[S. H.]

Elder C. B. Hassell baptized for this church more than one hundred and fifty persons, and her present membership is ninety-six.

34. South Mattamuskeet, Hyde County.—This church held her meetings originally on the south side of Mattamuskeet Lake, but now on the north side. It is the only church in the county, but there are several meeting places scattered around for convenience to the members. The constitution of this church does not appear, but in 1802 she was under the pastoral care of Elder William Carrowan, and consisted of about sixty members.

After the death of Elder Carrowan she was served by Elder John Bray. Elder Green Carrowan, son of Elder William Carrowan, was raised up to the ministry in this church and ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances. He took the pastoral care of her, and continued in the discharge of that office until he moved into Beaufort County and gathered a church on Goose Creek. Elder George W. Carrowan succeeded Elder Green Carrowan; Elder A. B. Swindelle succeeded him, and Elder Albert Cartwright succeeded Elder Swindelle. Elder Cartwright is pastor of the church at present, and is a very useful and worthy minister of the gospel. The church is in a prosperous condition. Her monthly meetings are on the first Sunday and Saturday before. She now has one hundred and fourteen members.

35. South Quay, Southampton County, Va.—At a conference held on the first day of March, 1775, Holland Darden and Solomon King were chosen Deacons, and Elisha Darden chosen Clerk of the church (as it was then considered, though without a constitution), and Elder David Barrow pastor. The membership at that time was composed of twenty-three whites, male and female, and nineteen blacks, making forty-two total.

In 1779 Solomon King was removed from the office of Deacon, and John Bowers appointed in his stead. From 1775 to 1785 the church was simply an organized body. At a conference held on September 3, 1785, a motion was made for a regular constitution of the church, and the adoption of a church covenant and rules of decorum; at which time Holland Darden and John Bowers were ordained by the imposition of hands as Deacons of the church, and Elisha Darden chosen as Clerk.

From 1798 to 1809 there seemed to be no regular pastor of the church. In 1809 Elder John Bowers took charge as pastor, with Jacob Darden as Clerk and Deacon. In 1817 Elisha Darden was chosen Deacon of the church, and ordained by Elders Jones and Darden; and Elder John Harrell was called to the pastoral care of the same. He remained pastor until 1826, when Simon Murphey was ordained a minister of the gospel by a presbytery composed of Elders Mitchell, Chambliss and Woodson, and Hardy Cross was ordained Deacon. Elder Simon Murphey remained pastor of the church until 1835, when a division took place among the members in regard to “missionary” societies, Sabbath Schools, and all kindred institutions of men as appendages to the church of Christ. The “missionaries” being in the minority, thought proper to remove their place of meeting across the Blackwater River into Nansemond County; while the majority, being established upon the old foundation of the Apostles, and adhering faithfully to the doctrine of salvation by grace, remained where they were and in the occupancy of the old meeting-house.

About the year 1837 this church united with those forming the Kehukee Association, and Edwin Harrison was chosen pastor. Elder Harrison continued pastor until about the year 1848, when he was removed, and Jonathan Lankford was chosen in his place, and filled the office until about 1856, when he was removed by death. Brethren Joseph J. Lawrence and A. L. Gardner were also chosen Deacons, and served the church until removed by death. Jesse B. Johnson is the present Deacon. This church has been served, for a number of years, by brethren in the ministry from various churches belonging to the Kehukee Association, all of which were located in North Carolina and at a considerable distance from the church, situated in Southampton County, in the State of Virginia.

In 1872 Elder Thomas O’Berry, of Tarborough, N. C., took the pastoral care of this church, and served her satisfactorily for some years. This church has greatly excited the sympathy of her sister churches of the Kehukee Association, because she was so far removed from most of them—was in another State, and was so completely surrounded by false churches, false teachers and false doctrines, that continually threatened to overwhelm her, and substitute in her place one of the daughters of Babylon. Her monthly meetings occur on the first Sunday and Saturday before; her number of members is nineteen.

36. Sparta, Edgecombe County.—In the year 1855 friends of the Primitive Baptists in and near the village of Sparta donated money and land, erected a house, and invited the Baptists to take charge of it and have regular meetings therein. On January 10, 1856, brethren and friends met there, also several ministers of the gospel. After preaching, the Elders and brethren met in council and appointed Elders Jesse Baker and John Stamper a presbytery, who constituted the church at this place with five members, three from the church at Conetoe, one from the church at Tarborough, and one from the church at Autrey’s Creek, all of whom had previously taken letters of dismission from their respective churches to form one at Sparta.

On Saturday before the fourth Sunday in April, 1856, they met in Conference and chose James Carney Deacon, and J. R. O’Berry Clerk; in July following brother Carney was ordained to the Deaconship by Elders William Hyman, Jesse Baker and William A. Ross. The church had no regular pastor from her ordination till 1859, and during this period she was served by Elders in the ministry, Edward Cox, William A. Ross, Jesse Baker, William Hyman, John Stamper, and others.

In August, 1859, Elder Edmund Edwards accepted the pastoral care of the church, and brother Edward Cobb was ordained Deacon at the same time by Elders John H. Daniel and Edward Cox. Brother Cobb filled the office of Deacon well; and with an upright walk and a godly conversation obtained the approbation of his brethren until he fell asleep in Christ, which occurred on May 1, 1870. Since May, 1873, the church has had no Deacon of her own, and has been served by visiting Deacons from neighboring churches. Elder Edwards continued to have the pastoral charge of this church until his death, which occurred February 6,1862. During his care of the church she was in a healthy condition, and in October, 1858, was received a member of the Kehukee Association. Elder Edwards was one of the most remarkable ministers ever raised up to that calling. He was very illiterate, and made use of broken language, but was one of the most spiritual of men; his preaching reached the hearts of his hearers, brought tears to their eyes, comforted their hearts, and convinced them of the mighty power of God dwelling in him thus to sway the hearts of the people and spread the feast of fat things before them. His ministry was short and precious to the saints.[1]

In 1873 the church called Elder Thomas O’Berry to her pastoral care, but there seems to be no record of his acceptance. At any rate he served the church both previous and subsequent to his call for a period of about six years. During recent years other ministers, both from the Kehukee and Contentnea Associations, have visited this church. Her monthly meetings are on the fourth Sunday and Saturday before. She has thirteen members.

37. Smithwick’s Creek, Martin County.—This church was at first a branch of the one at Skewarkey. While in that condition the members met for worship at the residence of brother Joshua Roberson, and had Elder Joseph Biggs to preach for them, and the church was eventually constituted in brother Roberson’s House. About the year 1803 or 1804 the members built them a meeting-house on Hay’s Branch, between two prongs of Smithwick’s Creek, from which creek the church derived its name, and still requested Elder Biggs to serve them as pastor, which he consented to do, and served them as such until about the year 1820.

Abraham Tice, a member of this church, exercised a ministerial gift, but was never ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances. Some years afterwards Hosea Lanier, a member of this church, after preaching several years, was ordained by Elders Joseph Biggs and Luke Ward; yet, notwithstanding the church requested it, he never gave his consent to take the pastoral care of her. He, however, served her in preaching and administering ordinances until about the year 1827 or 1828, when he took a letter of dismission from her and moved to the State of Tennessee, and settled on Hatchie River. Then Humphrey Stallings and Micajah Perry, both members of this church, commenced preaching, and being approved of by the church, they were at her request ordained by Elders Joseph Biggs and Lemuel Ross. Elder Stallings moved to Tennessee, and Elder Perry did not live many years to serve the church in a ministerial capacity, but was sound in the faith, and was quite gifted in spiritualizing all subjects that were presented to his mind.

Elder Jeremiah Leggett served this church at one time, but he embraced Arminian or free-will tenets, and led off several of the members into error. A division eventually took place, when the errorists were rejected by the Association, and those members holding to the old Articles of Faith and the ancient practice of the church were held to be the true church of Christ at Smithwick’s Creek.

The church then went down into a low, cold state for many years, with but very few members, small congregations and irregular preaching. Elder William Whitaker, whose membership was at Beargrass, was considered pastor of this church for many years, but he preached for them but seldom, and his attendance was very irregular. Elder C. B. Hassell and others visited the church occasionally while in this cold state, and the preaching, praying, sighing and groaning of God’s people were not all in vain, for the Lord broke forth at last in their behalf, and a season of refreshing from His presence was experienced by the saints at this place. Simon D. Ward, a young man about seventeen years old, was called from darkness to light and desired to join the church. His father, John Ward, and his brother, John L., sought to prevent it, fearing he was beside himself, and would harm himself and the church also. He was only kept back about one month, and was received and baptized in May, 1851. This was the commencement of joyful seasons. In July following his brother, John L., and others were received into the church, and for two or three years the church was blessed with the addition of about forty members, nearly all of whom have proved useful to her and the community in which they lived.

Her Clerks since 1830 have been H. Stallings, David Singleton and John L. Ward. Her Deacons have been, since then, John Hodges, Bethel Leggett, William Daniel, Eason Lilly and David Hardison.

Her ministers, raised up in her own body, have been Henry Peal and Levi Rogerson, who were licensed to exercise their gifts in June, 1860, and ordained in March, 1864, by Elders C. B. Hassell and William B. Perry, and in December, 1874, were both chosen pastors of the church in the place of Elder William Whitaker, deceased. Besides these named, Elders Thomas Biggs, John Ward, Clayton Moore, William Gray and William B. Perry have supplied this church by preaching for them in years past. And Elder Gray moved his membership to it from Morattock in April, 1876, where it remained to the period of his death in 1879.

38. Spring Green, Martin County.—This church was constituted in the year 1811 with about seventeen members, who were dismissed from some of the adjacent churches. Her house of worship is situated on the road leading from Williamston to Tarborough, about nine miles from Williamston. Shortly after her constitution she called on Elder William Hyman, whose membership was at Cross Roads, to serve her as pastor, which call he accepted, and continued to serve her until John Tice moved into the neighborhood and became a member thereof. He was received a member of this church upon a letter of dismission from Skewarkey. He had been preaching by permission of the church at Skewarkey; and after uniting with the church at Spring Green, he was ordained, and she called him to the pastoral care. After his removal in 1828 the church received the services of Elders William Hyman, Luke Ward and Joseph Biggs. Elder Blount Cooper preached for this church for several years, more or less uniformly, until perhaps about the year 1846. She has been blessed with preaching pretty much ever since she was organized, but up to 1880 had but one ordained minister who was raised up in her midst, and he was soon cut off from her communion and never restored. One of her members, brother George D. Roberson, after being licensed for several years, was ordained to the ministry in 1880. He is quite promising, and bids fair to become a useful minister and a satisfactory expounder of the word.

About the year 1840 Elder C. B. Hassell commenced visiting this church, and till the spring of 1845 was frequently at her meetings. Most of the years 1845 and 1846 he was absent from the county, but about the first of 1847 began again to serve her regularly and with very little exception until his death in April, 1880. He was her pastor for a long number of years. He baptized into her communion one hundred and twenty persons.—[S. H.]

Ministers visiting this church, besides those named, have been William W. K. Philpot, Luke Ward, David House, William A. Ross, John L Ross, Clayton Moore, William F. Bell, Edward Cox, John H. Daniel, P. D. Gold, R. H. Harris, John W. Purvis, Jordan W. Johnston, Henry Peal and Joseph E. Adams. This church shows signs of prosperity. Her membership is warm, and much devoted to the cause of her Lord and Master.

Her present Deacons are S. W. Outterbridge and R. D. Matthews. Brother S. W. Outterbridge was ordained in February, 1870, and brother R. D. Matthews in November, 1871. Brother Bennett was ordained long before (in 1852). Brother Bryant Bennett, a most lovely and exemplary Baptist, was Clerk and Deacon of this church for many years. He took great interest in the success of this History. He was most painfully afflicted with a cancer on his face about half of his life, and bore his sufferings with Christ-like resignation, and entered into rest in 1884. Brother Outterbridge has served as Clerk since 1868.—[S. H.]

This church is a member of the Skewarkey Union. Her monthly meetings are held on the fourth Sunday and Saturday previous; and her membership now is one hundred and three.

39. Tarborough, Edgecombe County.—This church was constituted on February 7, 1819, by Elders Joshua Lawrence, Martin Ross, Thomas Billings and Thomas Meredith. For a number of years previous to this preaching was occasionally heard in Tarborough, especially from the lips of that eminent servant of Christ, Elder Nathan Gilbert. He also endeavored to form a church there, but failed, as he could not induce a sufficient number of members to leave their churches for that purpose.

Subsequently Elder Joshua Lawrence frequently visited this place and preached. About two years before the constitution of this church, Elder Lawrence was heard to say that he was powerfully impressed with this passage of Scripture: “And God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham.” He renewed his ministerial exertions and commenced preaching there monthly, and shortly after this the church was formed. Elder Lawrence consented to continue his ministerial labors with the church; and in a few years, by letters of dismission from other churches and by baptisms, her number increased to about forty members, although there were only six at the formation. The church enjoyed much peace and harmony, and mutual love and fellowship seemed to prevail.

When Elder Lawrence first preached at this place he found much difficulty in procuring a house in which to preach. He often preached in a joiner’s shop belonging to Mr. McWilliams, and at other times in the Academy. At length the brethren and friends succeeded in erecting a meeting-house.

The good feeling existing in this church was at length destroyed for a season. About the year 1826 or 1827 serious threats were made against Elder Lawrence’s life; and he was warned by two or three messages in one week not to go to town on the succeeding Saturday to his appointment, as his life would be in danger. But he went to his meeting at the time appointed and preached to the church and people, speaking his mind freely. He, however, after this, for six or eight months, absented himself from this church, and during his absence the church called on Elder P. W. Dowd, of Raleigh, to preach for them, as he was spending much of his time in Tarborough. The difficulties arose in this church somewhat in this wise: Some of the members and also some of the visiting ministers frequented Masonic Lodges and parades, to the grief of those who were opposed to such things. And the course pursued by the advocates of “Missions” also caused grief in the minds of such as were opposed to new inventions and substitutes for the religion of Christ. In a short time parties were formed, and the most unpleasant occurrences took place. The members divided, and a small majority (nineteen to sixteen) appeared in favor of discountenancing these new things, and might have retained possession of the house, but Elder Lawrence had declared he would preach in that house no more, and the church followed him to the old public meeting-house belonging to the town. Here Elder L. and other ministers visiting Tarborough preached for many years.

The church represented herself as usual in the Association in 1829. She excluded her disaffected members afterwards; dismissed Elder Dowd from the pastoral care, putting Elder Lawrence in his place, and put William B. Collins as Clerk in the place of R. S. Long. On January 3, 1830, brother Coffield King was ordained Deacon by Elders Joshua Lawrence and Mark H. Bennett. Deacons afterwards appointed were R. D. Hart, Thomas O’Berry and James Hodges. After the resignation of W. B. Collins the following served in order as Clerk, viz.: Eli Porter, R. D. Hart, Coffield King, Asa Biggs and Joseph J. Porter.

James Elleanor was licensed to exercise his spiritual gifts in August, 1843, and died January 26, 1845, without ever being ordained. Robert D. Hart was received to baptism in July, 1841; licensed in September, 1843; and ordained in December, 1849. Daniel Land, a member of this church, was licensed in November, 1843, and ordained in May, 1848, by Elders Blount Cooper and John H. Daniel. Elder Blount Cooper, whose membership was at Conoho, took the pastoral care of this church in May, 1844, and held it till his death, which occurred about March, 1854. Elder Joshua Lawrence, former pastor, died Monday, January 23, 1843, aged sixty-five years, four months and thirteen days. Elder C. B. Hassell was requested in April, 1854, to accept the pastoral care of the church, but he declined in May following; yet he was with her at the August and November meetings of that year, and with slight exception visited the church at her May meetings until his death in 1880. Elder R. D. Hart took the pastoral care of the church in November, 1856. Elder Thomas O’Berry was licensed in September, 1860, and ordained in February, 1871. Elder Robert C. Leachman, a refugee from Virginia, preached a good deal for this church during the war between the States with ability and much satisfaction to the members. Elder I. N. Vanmeter, of Illinois, made a visit to North Carolina in 1874, and visited this church at her May meeting of that year.

Elder William Warren was ordained in November, 1873, chosen pastor in July, 1877, resigned his pastoral charge in September, 1878, and Elder P. D. Gold, of Wilson, was chosen in his place, and in January, 1879, accepted the call, and has served ever since in that capacity. Brother Joseph J. Porter was baptized in June, 1874, appointed Treasurer in place of C. King, deceased, in February, 1877, and is Clerk of the church at the present time. Her monthly meetings are the first Sunday and Saturday before. She has fifty-eight members.

40. White Plains, Beaufort County.—This church was organized by members dismissed from Beaverdam, a branch of the church at Washington. Her house of worship is situated between the towns of Washington and Plymouth. Upon her organization Elder Miles Everett, one of her own members, accepted the pastoral care of her. She was received a member of the Association in 1828, with about twenty members.

In March, 1840, Elder Jonathan Wallace took the pastoral care of the church, and Elder Arnot Waters was often with him in preaching for the church. Elder Wallace died in 1862, and Elder Waters continued preaching for the church until his death, which occurred April 24, 1866, aged about seventy years. In July, 1866, Elder Redding W. Peacock took the pastoral care of the church, and so continued to serve her until his death. In 1870 Elder N. H. Harrison took the pastoral care of the church, and served in that capacity several years.

Deacons: In 1828 brethren Asa Oden and George Harris were ordained Deacons. In 1835 John Haborn was ordained. In 1850 Levin Osbourn was ordained. In 1872 Langley R. Bowen and Thomas H. Wallace were ordained, and remain in office to the present time. Clerks: John Windley was chosen Clerk in 1828, Levin Osbourn in 1840, and James G. Bowen in 1850; the last named brother continues serving the church to the present time. Monthly meetings are held on the first Sunday in each month and the previous day. Number in fellowship, forty-eight.

41. Williams’s, Edgecombe County.—This church joined the Association in 1809, with thirty-five members. The name, originally, was Prospect Chapel, but in 1811 it was thought best to change the location of the house, and it was then called Williams’s, because Mr. John Williams donated to the church the land on which the house is erected. The church was constituted on Thursday before the fourth Sunday in August, 1804, by Elders Moses Bennett and Philemon Bennett, with members dismissed from Fishing Creek. After constitution. Elder Philemon Bennett served her as pastor, and continued to do so until 1820.

Under Elder Bennett’s ministry she experienced prosperous times, and in 1811 a season of refreshing came down upon her, during which about one hundred and ten persons were added by baptism. Brethren John George and James Elleanor were permitted by this church to exercise their spiritual gifts. After Elder Philemon Bennett ceased to serve the church, his son, Elder Mark H. Bennett, consented to take the pastoral care of her, January, 1830, and continued to do so till March, 1842.

After this time the church was visited by Elders R. D. Hart, J. H. Daniel, J. W. Stamper, and others, but had no pastor until September, 1876, when Elder Jordan W. Johnston was chosen to that office. This church has had three of her members ordained to the ministry, Willie Pittman, Blount Bryan and Jordan W. Johnston. Her Deacons have been David Bradley, Willie Pittman, Henry Pittman, Noah Leggett, S. B. Bradley, J. H. Pippen, Lawrence Johnston and William Vick.—[Last paragraph by S. H. ]

ENDNOTES:

[1] He was born October 20, 1816; joined the church at Autrey’s Creek June, 1853; was licensed to exercise his gift in March, 1856; and ordained to the ministry June, 1857. He had the care of four churches, and held out faithful to the end. He preached his last sermon on his bed eight hours before his death, and then said that his work was finished.—S. H.

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